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Drug Delivery Letters

Volume 1 Issue 2
ISSN: 2210-304x
eISSN: 2210-3031

 

   All Titles

  Nanoemulsions for Skin Targeting: Present Status and Future Prospects
  pp.159-170 (12) Authors: Mukta Singh, Subheet Jain
doi: 10.2174/2210304X11101020159
 
 
      Abstract

The use of nanoemulsions as a carrier system for skin targeting has attracted increased attention over recent years. Nanoemulsions can be intended for both topical and systemic delivery of the biologically active agents for controlled and targeted delivery. Nanoemulsion droplets fall within the size range of 20-200nm, typically below 100nm. Nanoemulsions have high surface area and ability to solubilize poorly soluble drugs. They are reported to have higher skin permeation and retention potential than other novel drug delivery systems like nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions etc. Use of nanoemulsions for skin targeting of drug is a current research scenario in the field of Pharmaceutics. This research area has generated immense interest from the Pharmaceutical industry and a number of nanoemulsion based cosmetics formulations like anti-aging creams, skin cleansing lotions etc. are available in the market. Recently, Zydus Cadilla launched the Oxalgin NanoGel™ diclofenac sodium nanoemulsion gel showing the importance of nanoemulsion as carrier system for skin targeting of drugs. This review embodies an in-depth discussion on composition, application, its mechanism of skin permeation and commercial aspects of nanoemulsions for skin targeting.

 
  Keywords: Anti-acne, skin targeting, nanoemulsion, NSAIDs, commercial products, anti-fungal, anti-cancer, TOPICAL DELIVERY, Anti-Cancer Drugs
  Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research, Punjabi University, Patiala, Patiala [Punjab] 147 002 India.
 
  Key: New Content Free Content Open Access Plus Subscribed Content

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